The Impact of Sustainable Building Materials in Reducing CO2 Emissions

With the threat of climate change literally still in the air, governments need to step up their efforts to reduce the dangers of global warming in accordance with the Paris Agreement international treaty. 

Australia has recently updated its Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) with more concrete plans to reach its target of Net Zero emissions by 2050.  Going Net Zero pertains to reducing harmful greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, balanced out by removals from the atmosphere.

One of the sources of carbon emissions comes from the building sector. The statistics are alarming: almost 40% of global CO2 emissions comes from building operations (28%) and from building construction and materials (11%).

Operational carbon emissions are derived from GHG released by energy sources used to power up the building’s facilities and to keep it warm, cool, lighted, or ventilated.

Embodied carbon emissions refer to GHG released from mining, logging, processing, manufacturing, and transporting of construction materials and from constructions in the built environment (man-made structures for human activity).

In 2019, 16% of Australia’s built environment emissions came from embodied carbon.  If left unchecked, this could rise to as much as 85% in 2050 – a far cry from the net zero goal for that year.

Factors to consider for sustainable materials

Concrete, steel, and aluminium are major contributors (23%) of total global emissions from built environments. The challenge now is designing, producing, and using materials for built environments that are both structurally durable and with minimal embodied carbon emissions.

The following elements should be taken into consideration when choosing the appropriate materials to help meet Net Zero standards.

  1. Fitness for purpose and design efficiency

In construction, fitness for purpose refers to when a contractor promises to deliver the work they’ll produce in accordance with the requirements and its intended use set by the principal.

To meet their expectations – especially if the principal needs to fulfil environmental standards – it is best to choose materials that are low in maintenance yet high in quality for longer performance and durability.

Design efficiency – optimising the design and the use of its materials to its maximum capacity at minimum cost – is also essential. This helps reduce the demand for more materials and, ultimately, diminish potential harmful emissions.

  1. Environmental impact declarations

Materials should provide information that indicates its environment effects. This includes a product’s life cycle analysis: what raw materials were consumed to produce this, how was it manufactured, what was the mode of transportation, what was the installation process, how will it be used and renewed, and what is its embodied carbon and pollution impact.

  1. Prefabricated construction materials

Prefabricated construction uses materials that were produced off-site in a factory. This is transported to the construction site where it will be installed.

Using this type of material can provide environment-friendly benefits. It helps minimise on-site construction waste and preserves the natural surroundings, including the local flora and fauna. It also saves on water and fossil fuel consumption due to more efficient transportation methods. Offsite production of prefabricated materials also reduces emissions and work interruptions.

  1. Practise responsible sourcing

Responsible sourcing or supply chain responsibility refers to a company’s efforts to procure materials that were sourced in a sustainable and ethical manner, without any negative social or environmental impact. For example, a supplier should have certification that they legally sourced their timber from responsibly managed forests.

These are among the accreditations that suppliers can obtain for as long as they fulfil the regulatory organisation’s requirements and maintain their quality standards.

  • ISO 14000 series, EMAS, and BES 6001 for environmental management
  • ISO 21930 and 21931 for construction products
  • EN 15804 AND 15978 for product level and building level assessments, respectively
  1. Context in the local built environment

In this particular field, context refers to the environmental conditions surrounding the construction project. The design and construction of a building, for example, should complement and support the local vicinity. It also takes into consideration the construction and installation materials that are appropriate to the environmental setting and to the local workforce.

 Context must take into consideration the area’s topography, historical and cultural significance, architectural trend, locally sourced materials, construction methods, weather and climate, the political situation, national and local regulations, and the economic state.

It becomes a concern when the project requires materials that are unfamiliar, the construction techniques are difficult to apply, or it causes maintenance problems that can affect the environment in remote areas and developing countries.

  1. End of life and deconstruction

End of life (EOL) is the final phase of a material’s use. In construction, EOL management involves knowing how to reuse the materials as they are and how will they be repurposed or recycled in such a way that it diminishes waste.

This is applied in the process of deconstruction wherein parts and materials will be carefully dismantled. Structural integrity must be preserved for recycling and repurposing so there will be less waste.

Reducing carbon emissions with Safetyline Jalousie

Aligned with the global initiative and Australia’s pledge to achieve Net Zero, Safetyline Jalousie is committed to support the building industry’s endeavours in reducing embodied carbon emissions in built environments.

Our long-lasting, high-performance louvre windows are now manufactured using Hydro REDUXA Aluminium — a low-carbon aluminium with ISO 14064 certification that covers all carbon emissions.  Using renewable energy from water (hydro power), wind and solar, we can produce cleaner aluminium, reducing the carbon footprint per kg of aluminium to 4.0 which is less than a quarter of the global average.

We also employ prefabrication processes in manufacturing and supplying our louvre windows as complete, framed and glazed units ready for installation. The prefab methodology ensures the highest standards, with precise, predetermined dimensions to guarantee quality every time and also reduces the quantity of waste materials on a building site. Factory offcuts are recycled for re-use rather than going into landfill.

Built to last, our louvre window products help create healthier ventilation systems that will also increase energy efficiency and significantly minimise the negative effects of energy consumption on the environment.

Learn more about our initiatives for sustainable solutions that will benefit your building projects. Contact us on 1300 863 350 or send your enquiries here and we’ll be happy to assist you.

Sign up to receive all of our latest news and updates

We wont spam you and you unsubscribe at anytime

Subscribe

Download SmartAir System & Free Motor Initiative proposal

The complete turnkey air quality solution that can deliver on environmental, economic and social benefits for built environments across Australia. In this brochure, you will find:

Smart Air Brochure

Download SmartAir System & Free Motor Initiative proposal

The complete turnkey air quality solution that can deliver on environmental, economic and social benefits for built environments across Australia. In this brochure, you will find:

Enter your details

Smart Air Brochure

Sign up to receive access to our complete Design Manual & more

You’ll receieve access to our 52 page complete Design Manual that includes:

Sign up to receive access to our complete Design Manual & more

You’ll receieve access to our 52 page complete Design Manual that includes:

Enter your details

Ali Asmar

Business Manager - VIC & SA

Likes

Dislikes

As the most recent addition to the Safetyline Jalousie family, Ali is still coming to terms with the fact that a typical telephone conversation will often be answered with “You’re calling from Safety what”? followed by having to sound out and spell the name “ja-lou-sie” (it happens to us all). Born in Lebanon, Ali has moved around a lot over the years, living in Cyprus, Sydney for most of his Schooling, as well as China and Hong Kong. He currently resides in Melbourne where he spends a lot of time in his garden or doing some sort of work around the house. (Not too dissimilar to many other Melburnians following the onset of Covid). With a very obvious cultured background, Ali is warm and talkative and he’ll get you talking too.

Romile John

National Business Manager

Likes

Dislikes

One of the Safetyine Jalousie originals, Rom (often mistaken for John) holds a great passion for the product. He says its “its innovative, a market leader and ever-evolving, very much like the company itself”. When you meet Rom, it is apparent that he is well-educated and well-travelled. Coming from a family of medical professionals, they moved around extensively and often. Last count was 125 countries. So nearly all of them! It’s really no surprise that Rom has mastered packing a weeks-worth of clothes and necessities into a carry-on bag. And when we say clothes we actually mean meticulously prepared outfits and accessories. When Rom enters a room, you’re sure to know it!

Adam Racomelara

National Manager – Partnerships & Strategy

Likes

Dislikes

Adam is our strategist and big ideas generator whose somewhat reserved nature could have some mistake him as a bit of an introvert. But that’s only until this quiet thinker is given a whiteboard and a marker – and then there’s no stopping the dialogue! 7 Years in at Safetyline Jalousie, Adam is continually expanding on his knowledge of the construction industry and is incredibly driven in his pursuit to help create better buildings via the use of better products. When Adam’s not on his quest to improve Australia’s built environment he’s spending most weekends escorting one of his 4 young kids to birthday parties, sometimes multiple parties. He has some stealth survival tips for other parents currently in the same predicament.

Michael Cocks

Factory Manager

Likes

Dislikes

Michael has become recognised at Safetyline Jalousie for his continually changing hairstyles (facial hair included). Buzz cut, undercut, dreadlocks, even a mullet. We’ve see it all. His current man bun could even be gone before we finish this sentence. Always up for a laugh, friends and colleagues love a chat with Michael, and his easy-going and approachable nature has earned him the respect of all staff. In fact, he even has a cohort of followers on the factory floor sporting his same hairstyles. Outside of work Michael has recently turned his attention to mountain bike riding. His very first ride ended with a pretty serious accident resulting in a deep puncture wound to his leg– it’s been a sore topic for his leg and his ego.

Jonathan Gueudinot

National Logistics & Production Manager

Likes

Dislikes

Our South American Native, Jonathan is more simply and better known as “Chilli” (no need to try and guess his country of origin). After 16 years of military service, Chilli joined the Safetyline Jalousie team for what he describes as “a change of pace”. Although his average work day might look very different these days, there’s no doubt that Chilli’s previous experience has contributed in shaping a culture of commitment, community and comradery within the production team – the very important engine room of our company. Driven by a sense of accomplishment, in addition to running Safetyline Jalousie’s production line with military precision, Chilli has recently been studying hard to complete his Master’s Degree in Business and Logistics.

Mandy Saliba

Marketing Manager

Likes

Dislikes

Mandy has been with Safetyline jalousie since day one so would technically be considered a geriatric in “Jalousie years”. Whilst her role has changed and evolved over her time with the business, one thing that hasn’t is the happy and fun, team culture that she says “continues to make each day at work a joy”. As a mum of two little ones, Mandy thrives on new challenges and a little bit of chaos. Although, as a self-proclaimed clean freak, she ensures that all forms of chaos are kept in a very neat and tidy manner. We’ve also observed that Mandy appears to have an inherent fear of colour and will almost only ever be seen in black or white (or sometimes grey if she is being really out there).

Lisa Spinks

Office Administration Manager

Likes

Dislikes

As a busy mother of 4, Lisa is highly skilled in organising, delegating, and troubleshooting – the proficiencies which she also demonstrates in her daily management of the Safetyline Jalousie office. Lisa tells us that she lives by the saying “What doesn’t break you makes you stronger”. (No doubt she’s had to use this little piece or personal encouragement from time to time to deal with our infinite requests)! Always on the go, Lisa has a very active lifestyle and starts every day with a walk to the beach with her husband and two dogs. Of an evening she still has the energy to spare for star jumps and squats in her makeshift gym/ (our office) before heading home to her other full-time job as “mum”.

 

 

 

Nathan Rust

Founder & National Operations Director

Likes

Dislikes

The younger brother of the co-founding sibling duo, “Nath” is the go-to for just about every technical, install, and manufacturing enquiry that comes via the business. Very early on, Nath’s product knowledge and problem-solving ability saw him organically take on the role of Operations, overseeing the design and management of Safetyline Jalousie’s behind-the-scenes work. When he’s off duty (and not answering a million questions), Nath enjoys spending time with his wife and 3 young kids. You’ll find him cheering on his son at weekend sports, enjoying the water somewhere along the Northern beaches and this lover of food is generally always planning his next big meal. Preferably a Lebanese banquet if anyone can suggest a restaurant he doesn’t frequent already.

Leigh Rust

Founder & Director

Likes

Dislikes

Leigh aka “Wolfpack” is one-half of the driving force behind Safetyline Jalousie and comes with two decades of experience within the Australian manufacturing and construction industry. The multi-award-winning entrepreneur and father of three youngsters is a passionate advocate for supporting Australian-made goods and improving the built environment for future generations to come. Always up for a challenge, Leigh never sits still and is constantly pushing himself to test his physical and mental endurance. He’s given just about everything a go. From amateur MMA fights, triathlons, or personal development endeavours, Leigh stands by the motto, ‘I never lose, either I win or I learn’.

Sign up to receive access to our complete Design Manual & more

You’ll receieve access to our 52 page complete Design Manual that includes:
Safetyline Jalousie Design Manual Version 3

Sign up to receive access to our complete Design Manual & more

You’ll receieve access to our 52 page complete Design Manual that includes:

Enter your details

Safetyline Jalousie Design Manual Version 3